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Contents:
  1. Joshua Gans
  2. An Economist Dad Looks at Parenting
  3. Details about Joshua Gans
  4. Parentonomics: An Economist Dad Looks at Parenting by Joshua Gans

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Joshua Gans

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I was so looking forward to reading this book, so maybe I damned it with too high expectations. The thing about econ is that you have to start with base assumptions about people, and I found some of his disturbing.

An Economist Dad Looks at Parenting

There are many things that are fine to discuss in aggregate, but parenting specific, individual children based on generalizations is not one of them. I have done graduate I was so looking forward to reading this book, so maybe I damned it with too high expectations. I have done graduate work in econ as well as worked with children and their families, and while the concept of this book was cute I would not recommend it to anyone that I thought would take it too seriously.

Apr 28, Michael rated it liked it. I think another reviewer already pointed out that the book is neither a good parenting book nor a good economics book. However, if you go into reading this thinking you'll learn about parenting or economics, you'll be just as disappointed. I enjoyed the book much more when I put those desires aside and just enjoyed it for what it was: anecdotal stories about a family.

Details about Joshua Gans

Aug 17, Raji Anand rated it really liked it. Hilarious and at the same time prepares one for parenting challenges :- Enjoyed reading it. There are times when you want to read certain passages aloud to your spouse. Gans, J. Parentonomics: An economist dad looks at parenting. I've never mind laughed so hard since reading NeilHumphreys! You only have to look around the room to get a sense of foreboding that accompanies a ticking time bomb. Me: That's 'cos you were the time bomb. She then fell asleep, Gans, J. She then fell asleep, leaving me to enjoy dinner in peace.

I came away from that experience thinking that no time was too soon for drugs in labor. Perhaps at the onset of pregnancy. What's the most deliveries you've done in a day? What's your largest baby? And so on. He was into it, but the midwives weren't. They were horrified. They could not believe how unsupportive I was. Indeed, 3.

My wife would introduce me: This is my husband, Joshua. Yes, we know him, came the contemptuous reply. It must've been thousands of babies later, and I was still infamous, my picture adorning their coffee room wall or dartboard. The narrator continued: And now Daddy can play a role.

He is handed scissors and cuts the cord. My eyes rolled. This hardly looked like an important role. It was tokenism at best. To me, what also appeared pretty simple was the 'catching' job the obstetrician did. The baby came out; it was caught; everyone as relieved. Hardly rocket science. It was time for me to step up and propose something real tondo.

Something necessary, involving potential risk, that I could actually savour as an important life moment.

I wanted to catch. We want sleep, and the baby wants attention. There is an inherent conflict here. The screams of a baby are like an offer: I'll stop screaming of you give me attention.

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Parentonomics: An Economist Dad Looks at Parenting by Joshua Gans

And it's not a vague offer. Give the baby attention, and they crying stops. After only a few tries, a little baby can train its parents nicely. They appreciate the beauty and function of the design. Perhaps they also suspect teacher they'll be wearing one in 70 years' time. Why deny them in the interim? Birthday invites, catalogs, bills, court summonses, and other stuff goes there.

Everyone knows that if something is out in the pile of death, it'll never be seen again. If the children see us putting an invitation in the pile, they scream: "Nooooo! Not there! She can construct a case to save every last thing from eviction. I can also use it as a small cup.


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